On Editing

Note: Collaborators are listed at the bottom of this page, and all links lead to the same question page.

1. How have you experienced writer/editor relationships and what advice would you offer to aspiring editors?
This is actually a large question. Those relationships have been too varied over too many years to summarize briefly. To give a true picture, I need to include people with editorial roles ranging from teachers to writer friends to agents to actual editors. Essentially that means being anecdotal, so I hope you’ll bear with me. Read more…

 2. How would you describe the process of editing your own work? How would you describe the way you read and/or edit other people’s work? What is similar or different about these processes?
I’ve heard writers make a hard distinction between writing and editing. I think their idea is that the writer as critic gets in the way of the inspiration for story. While there are certainly times when I write with a uninterrupted urgency, more often the process of capturing a story involves scribbling or typing out phrases and ideas before they disappear yet making the process of ongoing revision the real work of composition. Read more… 

3. Have you considered writing a memoir now that you’ve completed your novels?
A number of people have suggested that. They seem to feel it’s the natural next (or last) step, but the simplest answer is no. Read more…

4. What specific or generalized criteria did you use to determine which professionals you would ask to join your staff at Sky Spinner Press? More specifically, what about Mary Byers made her your choice for copyeditor?
Just to clarify, although Sky Spinner Press is an incorporated legal entity, I’ve been its only full time worker since its inception. The other members of the team are independent contractors who worked on other projects even during the most intensive parts of the Sky Spinner production process. Read more…
5. Do you foresee the possibility of Sky Spinner Press publishing books by other authors at some point? If so, what sort of criteria would you use to select manuscripts? What sort of authors would you hope to publish?
If I were at a different point in my life, the answer to this question might well be yes as I think the huge changes in publishing mean real opportunities for both writers and publishers. It could be serious fun to play a larger role in the creative part of that process; just establishing Sky Spinner and learning so much I didn’t know about publishing was exciting. Read more…
6. In considering the development of internet advertising over the last two decades and the more recent advent of creative crowd-funding, what are your thoughts regarding the feasibility of publishing via webpage? If so, how would you see such publications changing the form of the novel?
This is not something I’ve thought a great deal about, in part because I find the areas of distribution, publicity, and marketing far and away the most opaque parts of this whole process and the most resistant to change. That doesn’t mean that they aren’t changing and won’t change a whole lot more. Read more…

–In collaboration: Alexis Easley, Brittney Wolf, Bethany Fletcher, Jackie Milbrandt, Nathan Wunrow, Brigitte Budahn, Ethan Krueger, Kristin Demery, Devin Taylor, Mercedes Sheldon, Peter Larson, Kara Meyers

Return

Permanent link to this article: http://emilymeier.com/interview/on-editing